Bondage

bondage-of-the-will-85k.jpg

I started reading this around last Thursday sometime. So far I’ve finished the Intro and THAT by itself was worth the cost of the book. I’ve already reached the conclusion that Erasmus was actually a Southern Baptist who accidentally encountered a space/time vortex…

Advertisements

10 responses to “Bondage

  1. I read it about a year ago. Read it with pen and paper in hand. He completely dismantles Free Will…How Melanchthon ever went Semi-Pelagian after being around Luther, I’ll never understand.

  2. Oh yeah. It’s that good Nicholas.

    I started the actual book last night. I’ve got some quotes picked out I’ll probably post on later but yeah ‘dismantles’ is probably the kindest thing you could say about what he is doing.

    While I was reading the intro I noticed that Melanchthon was regarded as a moderating influence on Luther so I suppose it’s possible that he was almost there anyway (this is purely supposition on my part though. I don’t have the history to make any serious comments about it.)

  3. “I noticed that Melanchthon was regarded as a moderating influence on Luther so I suppose it’s possible that he was almost there anyway.”

    You’re probably right…We are all born Arminians after all…;)

  4. Arminians*chuckle

    Isn’t there a classic rock song about that “Born to be Arminian…” something like that…

    All things considered I prefer the solidity of God’s Sovereignty especially after two point Baptist for so many years…you know, 1. Me, 2. Jesus.

  5. Josh,

    “two point Baptist for so many years…you know, 1. Me, 2. Jesus.”

    We can joke about that, but it is amazing how prevelant that attitude is. I was discussing the doctrines of grace with a member of our church one time and he began yelling at me, “I chose God! I chose God!”

    Now, I didn’t disagree with him that he chose God. You have to believe in Christ and that is a volitional action. But, going to Scripture and showing him that the Holy Spirit first had to enable him to believe just threw him for a loop. He ended the conversation by again yelling at me that we belong to different religions…I thought that that was a very odd statement to make since we had served on the music team together for about 4 years. But, on a certain level, I have to agree with him.

    If I remember correctly, I think Luther makes that abundantly clear in Bondage of the Will. There is God saving man or there is man saving himself with a little assistance.

  6. Bummer about losing your previous blog…what happend?

  7. I messed up the blogger crossover or did something that Google didn’t like or something like that…I’m pretty sure it was faulty end user thing and not a software glitch. I ended up deleting the thing and starting over. ( I’ve still got all my old posts, I just lost my links.) I had this set up for a small-group study I was doing using “Amazing Grace” by Timothy George so I just continued here. I think I like WordPress better but I never got to use the beta so who knows.

    different religion[snip]I have to agree with him.

    Yeah. I wrestle with that all the time. I go to a toe-the-line BF&M2K Southern Baptist Church and its tough. Imagine doing the above study–which is unapologetically reformed–and coming to the realization that the people in the small group were viewing it as preparation to refute what you were teaching. We spent like four weeks on Ephesians chapter 1 and they were still working hard to figure out how IT fit in with THEIR idea of salvation and blessing (continuationist) and not the other way around.

  8. “they were still working hard to figure out how IT fit in with THEIR idea of salvation and blessing (continuationist) and not the other way around.”

    And they accuse us of coming to the text with a philosophical bias…

    If they are true BF&M2Kers, I’m doing a series right now on Calvinism and the history of Baptist confessions. Nothing incredibly deep, just looking at the evolution of the language from Westminster/Savoy/LBC2nd to the present.

    The ghost of Calvinism is still present in the BF&M2K, even though it is remarkably weaker than early American Baptist confessions.

    I’m trying to demonstrate how the current confession is completely consistent with the Biblical testimony of God’s sovereignty in salvation, albeit, impliedly so at some points.

  9. Good luck with that Kevin. Last year I took the BF&M2K and read it, then laid it out side by side with the Abstract of Principles from Southern Seminary. They don’t even compare. I mean some of the headings are the same… 😉

    My conclusion was that the BF&M2K was a completely man centered document. It’s all about man’s choice and how man does this and that to be saved and goes through a lot of textual gymnastics to prove it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s