Trading Pottage

I haven’t looked in on the Baptiblogs in a long while, and with good reason. There is always some sort of a catfight going on that makes the casual reader feel like a neighbor who can’t help but hear the couple next door’s highly personal bickering. It’s embarrassing to hear it but sometimes you just have to listen. I think that’s the way the Baptiblogs are a lot of time. If you start checking them out, sooner or later a topic is going to come up and you won’t be able to help yourself. You’ll start with a casual remark but pretty soon it will be snide rejoinders sprinkled with the occasional long diatribe. Thats something you can control, however. Unlike you neighbor’s fighting you can just refuse to read them.

I went and had a look this morning and while there doesn’t appear to be anything new brewing, the convention is coming. As it draws closer the activity will pick up. Harsh words will be written. Vitriol, the Baptist Beverage, will flow like wine. That portion of the internet staked out by the SBC will become a battle field of prose, each writer telling us what we need and what we don’t and why the Bible supports their particular position. Verses will be quoted in and out of context and pretty soon someone will bust out their Greek/Hebrew notes from Seminary and prove with references that Dr. Jotantittle backs them up 100%.

rain-man-2.jpgAnd we like so many theological rainmen will listen. We will ruminate over the smooth talk and well-oiled retorts and finally reach the startling conclusion: K-mart sucks. Oh, we’re not really sure why K-mart sucks, but someone really cool and eloquent has told us that it does and offered us a more costly replacement for that which we already have. It’s more comfortable and refined, but is it better? Are we trading our Baptist heritage for a mess of ‘bloggage’?

30And Esau said to Jacob, Feed me, I pray thee, with that same red pottage; for I am faint: therefore was his name called Edom. 31And Jacob said, Sell me this day thy birthright. 32And Esau said, Behold, I am at the point to die: and what profit shall this birthright do to me? 33And Jacob said, Swear to me this day; and he sware unto him: and he sold his birthright unto Jacob. 34Then Jacob gave Esau bread and pottage of lentiles; and he did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way: thus Esau despised his birthright. –Genesis 25:29 – 34 (KJV)

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8 responses to “Trading Pottage

  1. Vitriol, the Baptist Beverage, will flow like wine.

    C’mon, Josh…don’t get bitter; get better…;)

  2. Preachin’ to the choir bro., preachin’ to the choir. I’m just wondering what the next great source of ‘prospects’ is going to be…

  3. I cringe every time that word is used in the context of missions…are we peddlars of God’s grace or have we been granted the glorious ministry of proclaiming reconciliation to the lost?

    But, the mentality of marketing membership has just captivated the SBC missions mindset…Did I just use alliteration? Ugh! Next I’ll be posting in three points…

  4. Three hymns and an offeratory…
    Three points and a poem…
    Every head bowed, every eye closed…

    Oh yeah, ‘church growth’…

    There’s only a small difference, actually, between Simon Peter and Simon Magus and that would be the grace of God. I have to be happy that some are preaching the Gospel even if its out of bad motives. I’m sure there’s a Bible reference in there somewhere.

  5. Well…it beats Emerson…

  6. You know, churches that have no preaching of the Word, just pagan poets…

  7. Gotcha.

    I think you’re right. And sometimes churches have preaching but it isn’t exactly preaching of the word.

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